Art Collections: Printmaking

Artist: Michael Barnes

Michael Barnes Michael Barnes
Title: Harvest
Medium: Lithograph on paper
Location: Student Center, 2nd floor outside President’s office
Title: Profile I
Medium: Lithograph on paper
Location: Student Center, hallway by Financial Aid office
Artist Statement/ Info: http://michaelbarnes.us

Artist: Amy Casey

Amy Casey Artist Statement/ Info: http://amycaseypainting.com/

After any pendulum swing of chaos grinds to a slow halt, there will come a time when you will have to decide if you are going to wallow in the rubble or take what remains and create a new empire. Building upon recent work, I have been in search of a solid ground. A bit less kinetic than past work, I have been trying to take what was left of the world in my paintings and create a stability of sorts, thinking about community ties and the security (or illusion of security) needed to nurture growth. Cities are fascinating creatures that I am just beginning to scratch the surface of. The work and organization that goes into a city’s creation and evolution, the constant shifting and adaptions and the sometimes hidden history of these changes, and a city’s dependence on civilian cooperation are things I like to think about. Reflecting this interest, burgeoning cities have begun to fill in the voids in my paintings. As in life, with a sort of trial and error, some efforts work better in making the whole precarious heap hum. I am consistently fascinated by the resilience of life and our ability to keep going in the face of sometimes horrendous or ridiculous circumstances. My paintings celebrate this fascination and my love of the urban landscape.

Since earning her BFA in painting from the Cleveland Institute of Art in 1999, Amy Casey has shown her work regionally and nationally with solo shows in Cleveland, Chicago, San Francisco and Los Angeles. Her work has been published in the New York Times, New American Paintings, Juxtapoz, Hi Fructose and Elephant Magazine. She enjoyed a fellowship at the Vermont Studio Center and a summer residency at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, MA- the latter in conjunction with the Ohio Arts Council. She was artist in residence at Zygote Press in 2006 and is currently working there as a Resident Artist. Casey has been awarded two Ohio Arts Council Individual Excellence Awards, the Cleveland Arts Prize as an emerging artist and a grant through CPAC's Creative Workforce Fellowship program. Represented by Zg Gallery in Chicago, Casey resides in a little blue house in Cleveland.
Title: Watchtower, 2010
Medium: sepia etching on paper, ed. 23/40
Location: TBD

Artist: David F. Driesbach

David F. Driesbach David F. Driesbach
Title: The Everyday Occurrence
Medium: engraving on Arches paper 
Year: 1973
Donated by artist
Location: Student Center, 2nd Floor, near Counseling
Title: Albert’s Dog
Medium: engraving on Arches paper
Year: 1973
Donated by artist
Location: Student Center, 2nd Floor, near Counseling
Artist Statement/ Info: http://davidfdriesbach.com

A bespectacled top-hatted man holding a wine glass while pedaling a bicycle at night under a crescent moon. A chandelier mysteriously suspended from the sky-an open window with lace curtains billowing white against brick walls. Someone playing a violin. Greek columns, neckties, billboards with enigmatic images, light bulbs and candles-these and many other strange objects and happenings crowd my space and continue a compulsion to create etchings and lithographs.

I have always admired the prints and drawings of Picasso, Chagall, and Ernst. In artists like Albrect Durer and the Northern Renaissance painters like Van Eyck, Bouts, and Bosch I am fascinated by their microscoptic detail. I am compelled by the brutish naivety of much Medieval Art-their architecture, illuminated manuscripts and iconography. Being primarily a printmaker, technique has always been my obsession.

When I was at the University of Iowa (1948-51) working toward my MFA in painting I took courses in intaglio every semester. This was under the tutelage of Mauricio Lasansky. I soon became aware of a deep and abiding interest in story telling as well as strong composition. The works of Goya and Rembrandt, Picasso, and Chagall took on great importance for me. Many years later, in 1969, while on a sabbatical, I had the opportunity to study with Stanley William Hayter in Paris. That experience proved to be truly liberating. His atelier was just developing Color Viscosity Printing, a means of printing multiple colors at one pass thru the press. His philosophy of teaching and approach to working the metal plate as well as his use of color opened new ways of advancing my own personal imagery.

I've always had a yen for humor and often I think of my prints in terms of theatre--a stage setting, the main characters, the music accompanying the action, the symbolism, mood, and yes, sometimes even the words appearing-after all Fra Angelico did that. Witness his "Annunciation" in the monastery at Florence where he painted the message backward going from the mouth of the angel to the ear of the Virgin-- so she could read it.

I've been to Europe five times. All of those trips and experiences were undoubtedly of utmost importance to my development as an artist. In the past I have taught courses in Art History as well as Drawing and Printmaking. These together with innumerable visits to museums and Exhibitions have helped to mold my career.

It has always been a "fun thing" to approach a blank sheet of copper with only the vaguest idea of what I'll be doing with it-to see another adventure happen. Sometimes I spend seven or eight months on a piece. Then again I may work only a few days to complete it. My prints have become part of more than 500 museum and public collections. They have been reproduced in numerous text books and have received more than 200 prizes in competitions.

Artist: David F. Driesbach

David F. Driesbach Artist Statement/ Info: http://davidfdriesbach.com

A bespectacled top-hatted man holding a wine glass while pedaling a bicycle at night under a crescent moon. A chandelier mysteriously suspended from the sky-an open window with lace curtains billowing white against brick walls. Someone playing a violin. Greek columns, neckties, billboards with enigmatic images, light bulbs and candles-these and many other strange objects and happenings crowd my space and continue a compulsion to create etchings and lithographs.

I have always admired the prints and drawings of Picasso, Chagall, and Ernst. In artists like Albrect Durer and the Northern Renaissance painters like Van Eyck, Bouts, and Bosch I am fascinated by their microscoptic detail. I am compelled by the brutish naivety of much Medieval Art-their architecture, illuminated manuscripts and iconography. Being primarily a printmaker, technique has always been my obsession.

When I was at the University of Iowa (1948-51) working toward my MFA in painting I took courses in intaglio every semester. This was under the tutelage of Mauricio Lasansky. I soon became aware of a deep and abiding interest in story telling as well as strong composition. The works of Goya and Rembrandt, Picasso, and Chagall took on great importance for me. Many years later, in 1969, while on a sabbatical, I had the opportunity to study with Stanley William Hayter in Paris. That experience proved to be truly liberating. His atelier was just developing Color Viscosity Printing, a means of printing multiple colors at one pass thru the press. His philosophy of teaching and approach to working the metal plate as well as his use of color opened new ways of advancing my own personal imagery.

I've always had a yen for humor and often I think of my prints in terms of theatre--a stage setting, the main characters, the music accompanying the action, the symbolism, mood, and yes, sometimes even the words appearing-after all Fra Angelico did that. Witness his "Annunciation" in the monastery at Florence where he painted the message backward going from the mouth of the angel to the ear of the Virgin-- so she could read it.

I've been to Europe five times. All of those trips and experiences were undoubtedly of utmost importance to my development as an artist. In the past I have taught courses in Art History as well as Drawing and Printmaking. These together with innumerable visits to museums and Exhibitions have helped to mold my career.

It has always been a "fun thing" to approach a blank sheet of copper with only the vaguest idea of what I'll be doing with it-to see another adventure happen. Sometimes I spend seven or eight months on a piece. Then again I may work only a few days to complete it. My prints have become part of more than 500 museum and public collections. They have been reproduced in numerous text books and have received more than 200 prizes in competitions.
Title: Magician’s Sabbath
Medium: lithograph, ed. 16/40
Year: unknown
Donated by artist
Location: Student Center, 1st floor, near the bus stop

Artist: Fumio Kitaoka

Fumio Kitaoka Artist Info:
 
Info: http://www.myjapanesehanga.com/home/artists/fumio-kitaoka-1918-2007-

Profile
Kitaoka Fumio 北岡文雄 (1918-2007) 
Sources: http://www.cartage.org.lb/en/themes/biographies/MainBiographies/k/Kitaoka/kitaoka.htm and Revisiting Modern Japanese Prints: Selected Works from the Richard F. Grott Family Collection, Helen M. Nagata, Helen Merritt, Northern Illinois University Art Museum, 2007, p. 93 and as footnoted.

Fumio Kitaoka (Tokyo, born,1918) is one of Japan's finest woodcut masters of the latter twentieth century. He first studied printmaking techniques and drawing under Unichi Hiratsuka (1895-1997) at the Tokyo Bijutsu Gakko. Graduating during the Second World War, Kitaoka first taught art in Tokyo and in January 1945 was posted to a similar position in occupied Manchuria.  His experiences in China led to the social realist series of 17 prints Journey to the Native Country (1947) chronicling his difficult repatriation to Japan.

After returning to Tokyo he attended the evening classes of one of Japan's most influential woodblock artists, Koshiro Onchi (1891-1955) joining Onchi's First Thursday Society and contributing prints to its publication Ichimokushū in 1947 and 1948.  The following year Kitaoka created the series The Face of Tokyo, five portfolios of prints documenting the beginning resurgence of post-war Japan.  [See this collection's printAround Ochanomizu (Kanda River).]  In 1955, Kitaoka moved to Paris to study wood engraving techniques at the Ecole des Beaux Arts.  He was not interested in formal theories of art, but he sought to understand the work of Western painters such as Van Gogh, Cezanne, Matisse and Picasso.  
Upon returning to Japan in 1957, he firmly established himself as a contemporary master of the woodblock. His woodblock art was almost immediately distinguished for his use of perspective and receding space combined with the bold and almost sculptural effects he achieved by printing his blocks under very high pressure. As one can see in Fishing Boat and Green Crow (left), this lends a powerful, almost three dimensional effect to foreground objects. 

In the mid-60s, Kitaoka taught at the Minneapolis School of Art and at Pratt Graphic Arts Center in New York.

For years, the woodcut art of Fumio Kitaoka has been the subject of many exhibitions in Japan, America and Europe. Museums that list his woodcuts within their permanent collections include, the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, The Art Institute of Chicago, the National Museum, Warsaw and the Japanese Museum of Israel. Fumio Kitaoka has been named an honorary member of the Japan Print association and has served as Director of the Japanese Artists Association.

He died of pneumonia on April 23 2007.
Title: Fishing Village in the Afternoon 
Medium: Japanese woodblock print, ed. 84/210 
Year: 1967

Artist: Utagawa Kunisada II (1823-1880)

Utagawa Kunisada II       Utagawa Kunisada II
Title: Tale of Genji
Medium: Japanese woodblock print
Artist Info:
 
Informational video- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-tSvQ7Ai6s

http://www.myjapanesehanga.com/home/artists/utagawa-kunisada-ii

Artist: Ashley Nason

Ashley Nason Artist Statement/ Info:

My current work explores the evolution of our environment and the changes in the existence of the natural world as a result of overconsumption, pollution, and misuse of natural resources. My current body of work goes further to explore nostalgia, fear, ambivalence, and resistance of technology in our current age.   Notions of romanticism in relation to travel, isolation, and remoteness play out in my narratives.  I envision places in which there is a struggle to embrace these romantic ideologies and yet a necessity to do so.  In most instances this struggle is embodied in animals and their plight to survive.  In other works the residual spaces and structures indicate the pursuit to exist in harmony with an unstable environment.    Structures and events such as spewing oil, falling black rain, smoking towers, and dark looming clouds suggest that these depicted narratives and landscapes are a result of human intervention.  The structures that reside or travel through a number of potentially volatile environments indicate a strategy of reinvention or re-purposing of materials to create quasi-living spaces and encampments that are just as temporal and elusive as the spaces they inhabit.  In most instances the animals signify the search and promise of pioneering expansion and exploration as they are found to be embracing, fleeing from, or held captive in a perilous state.  This collision of human construct and nature is exploited to reveal a fragile and unbalanced state that exists in nature.  These narratives depict the real, the unreal, the tangible, and the intangible to formulate landscapes serving as metaphors for an ever-changing world in which much of life on earth has been used, damaged, and depleted. 
Title: Smoke Signals
Medium: Lithograph
Year: 2011
Location: Student Center, 1st Floor, Student Conference Room

Artist: Brina D. Notz

Brina D. Notz Artist Statement/ Info:
Title: Bare Streets
Medium: serigraph, ed. 4/8 
Year: 1992

Artist: Ed Paschke

Ed Paschke Artist Statement/ Info: http://www.edpaschke.com/home.php

Ed Paschke was born in 1939 in Chicago. His childhood interest in animation and cartoons led him toward a career in art. As a student at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago he was influenced by many artists featured in the Museum's special exhibitions, in particular the work of Gauguin, Picasso and Seurat. Although Paschke's interests leaned towards representational imagery, he learned to paint based on the principles of abstraction and expressionism. Paschke received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1961, and his Master of Fine Arts degree from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1970. Between his graduate and undergraduate work Paschke traveled and worked a variety of jobs amassing the experiences that would shape his artistic style. During a brief period in New York, he was exposed to Pop Art philosophy and began to incorporate elements of this style borrowing images directly from the print media and other elements of popular culture. Themes of violence, aggression, and physical incongruity prevail in his work of this period. Returning to Chicago in 1968 he exhibited with other artists whose work, like Paschke's, shared references to non-Western and surrealist art, appropriated images from popular culture and employed brilliant color throughout a busy and carefully worked surface. Known collectively as the Imagists, their work attracted attention both regionally and nationally.

Paschke's work of the 1970's reflects society's subculture as the artist replaced images from the print media with images derived from the electronic media. In Paschke's most recent work, he enlarges scale to a grand proportion and includes images of such well-known figures as George Washington, Elvis Presley, and Mona Lisa. His work reveals a powerful interaction between humanity and technology capable of shaping perception at the most fundamental level.

In addition to his individual pursuits as a fine artist, Paschke was an active member of the academic community for most of his adult life. Following brief stops at a Barat College in Lake Forest Illinois, Meramec Community College in Kirkwood, MO. and the School of the Art Institute, Paschke became a full-time professor of art at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois in 1978. He remained there, where he often served as Chairman of the Art Department, for over twenty six years until his death in 2004. 
Title: Trabajo
Medium: 4-color lithograph, ed. 51/100
Year: 1993
Location: Student Center, Student Conference Room

Artist: Audrey Niffenegger

Audrey Niffengegger Title: The Letter
Medium: aquatint etching, ed 12/20
Year: 
Location: Student Center, 2nd floor, near Administration office
Artist Statement/ Info: Website; Author of Time Traveler’s Wife

Bio
Audrey Niffenegger was born in 1963 in the idyllic hamlet of South Haven, Michigan. Her family moved to Evanston, Illinois when she was little; she has lived in or near Chicago for most of her life. 

She began making prints in 1978 under the tutelage of William Wimmer. Miss Niffenegger trained as a visual artist at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and received her MFA from Northwestern University’s Department of Art Theory and Practice in 1991. She has exhibited her artist’s books, prints, paintings, drawings and comics at Printworks Gallery in Chicago since 1987. 

Her first books were printed and bound by hand in editions of ten. Two of these have since been commercially published by Harry N. Abrams:The Adventuress and The Three Incestuous Sisters. 

In 1997 Miss Niffenegger had an idea for a book about a time traveler and his wife. She originally imagined making it as a graphic novel, but eventually realized that it is very difficult to represent sudden time shifts with still images. She began to work on the project as a novel, and published The Time Traveler’s Wifein 2003 with the independent publisher MacAdam/Cage. It was an international best seller, and has been made into a movie. 

In 1994 a group of book artists, papermakers and designers came together to found a new book arts center, the Columbia College Chicago Center for Book and Paper Arts. Miss Niffenegger was part of this group and taught book arts for many years as a professor in Columbia College’s MFA program in Interdisciplinary Book and Paper Arts. She is now on the faculty of the Columbia College Fiction Writing Department. Miss Niffenegger has also taught for the Newberry Library, Penland School of Craft and other institutions of higher learning. 

Miss Niffenegger is a founding member of the writing collective Text 3 (T3). Recent T3 endeavors include the litmag little Bang and some rather amusing dinner parties. 

Miss Niffenegger’s second novel, Her Fearful Symmetry, was published in 2009 by Scribner (USA), Jonathan Cape (UK) and many other fine publishers around the world. In 2008 she made a serialized graphic novel for the London Guardian, The Night Bookmobile, which was published in book form in September, 2010. She is working on her third novel, The Chinchilla Girl in Exile.

Artist: Thomas W. Robertson

Roberson Artist Statement/ Info:
Title: Cool, Sweet, Unexerting, 2012
Medium: Paper Cut
Location: C Wing C1201-C1228

Artist: Amelia Spinney

Amelia Spinney Artist Statement/ Info: http://www.edpaschke.com/home.php

Ed Paschke was born in 1939 in Chicago. His childhood interest in animation and cartoons led him toward a career in art. As a student at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago he was influenced by many artists featured in the Museum's special exhibitions, in particular the work of Gauguin, Picasso and Seurat. Although Paschke's interests leaned towards representational imagery, he learned to paint based on the principles of abstraction and expressionism. Paschke received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1961, and his Master of Fine Arts degree from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1970. Between his graduate and undergraduate work Paschke traveled and worked a variety of jobs amassing the experiences that would shape his artistic style. During a brief period in New York, he was exposed to Pop Art philosophy and began to incorporate elements of this style borrowing images directly from the print media and other elements of popular culture. Themes of violence, aggression, and physical incongruity prevail in his work of this period. Returning to Chicago in 1968 he exhibited with other artists whose work, like Paschke's, shared references to non-Western and surrealist art, appropriated images from popular culture and employed brilliant color throughout a busy and carefully worked surface. Known collectively as the Imagists, their work attracted attention both regionally and nationally.

Paschke's work of the 1970's reflects society's subculture as the artist replaced images from the print media with images derived from the electronic media. In Paschke's most recent work, he enlarges scale to a grand proportion and includes images of such well-known figures as George Washington, Elvis Presley, and Mona Lisa. His work reveals a powerful interaction between humanity and technology capable of shaping perception at the most fundamental level.

In addition to his individual pursuits as a fine artist, Paschke was an active member of the academic community for most of his adult life. Following brief stops at a Barat College in Lake Forest Illinois, Meramec Community College in Kirkwood, MO. and the School of the Art Institute, Paschke became a full-time professor of art at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois in 1978. He remained there, where he often served as Chairman of the Art Department, for over twenty six years until his death in 2004. 
Title: Triumph
Medium: Screenprint on paper
Location: Student Center, 1st floor, Student Conference Room